SEWING BY HAND | Most Important Stitches to Know

hand sewing stitches - youmakeitsimple.comSewing by hand? Why in the world would you want to sew something by hand? Not everyone has access to a sewing machine or knows how to sew. Here are 3 of the most important hand sewing stitches to know. These stitches may come in handy, even for those who have a sewing machine. 

Actually, I find sewing something by hand can be quite relaxing! 

sewing by hand - youmakeitsimple.comKnowing how to sew these 3 basic stitches will allow you to mend and create items that maybe you thought you couldn’t because you don’t have a sewing machine.

Although there are several other hand sewing stitches and techniques, I am only going to show you the basting or running stitch, stretch stitch or herringbone stitch and the backstitch.

video tutorial

Items needed:

  • All-purpose thread
  • Scissors
  • Needle

(I recommend getting a variety set of needles to have handy for different projects). For basic hand sewing, use a sharp or a milliner. You can get more technical with eye size and point types, but for now, just choose one that is mid-size.

  • Thimble (optional)
  • Needle threader (optional)

hand sewing kitI recommend purchasing or making your own little sewing kit. What I love about this one is it comes with everything you’ll need, even my favorite fabric clips and small scissors. It comes with several colors of thread for those small mending projects.

Threading the needle

You can either use a single or double thread. I use a double thread for most projects. Don’t get the thread too long or it may be prone to tangling while sewing. A good length is around 16 inches after doubled.

sewing by hand - knotting the threadKnotting the thread

Each seam, unless you are just basting, will need to start and end with an anchor stitch. This is where you knot the thread so it will not come undone. Most projects you can just make a knot at the end of your thread.

To do this, simple take the ends of the thread and wrap it around your pointer finder then roll the thread between your fingers. Gently pull the thread and it will create a little knot. Then you’re ready to begin. To make a knot at the end of the seam, pull the needle to the back side and take a TINY stitch, leaving a little loop.

knotting the threadWrap the needle around the loop once and pull the thread. Thiswill knot the thread.

If you don’t want the bulk of a bunch of knots, you can us an anchor stitch. Simply take a tiny stitch and then another tiny stitch right by it. Then start your stitching. You can end a seam the same way.

SEWING BY HAND stitches that are important to know

sewing by hand - basting stitchBasting stitch/running stitch

The basting stitch/running stitch is great for temporarily holding pieces of fabric together or for quick seams that don’t need to be real sturdy. This stitch can also be used to gather fabric for ruffles or easing in.

Take the needle in and out of the fabric with ¼ to ½ inch long stitches. Take several stitches at a time by popping the needle in and out of the fabric before pulling through.

 

sewing by hand - stretch stitchStretch stitch/herringbone stitch

This stitch has several names. I like to call it a hand stretch stitch because it works so well with stretchy fabrics. (The seam won’t pop and break like a straight stitch will when sewn on knit fabrics).

You can also use it for hemming and decorative embroidery and quilt making.

Drawing two horizontal lines with washable pencil or chalk will help as a guide while sewing. Work the stitch from left to right, making little back stitches and crossing over at a diagonal to the other line.

 

 

sewing by hand - backstitchbackstitch

The backstitch is one of the strongest, most adaptable stitches. This stitch mimics the straight stitch you would see on a sewing machine and is good to know for simple mending jobs and other small projects. Also good to know if you plan on sewing your own clothing by hand.

backstitchTo keep your seam as straight and as tidy as possible, it’s helpful to mark the line of stitching with a thin pencil line. You can us a sharp pencil, chalk pen, or washable ink. On straight seams, use a ruler.

Push the needle into the fabric where you want to start the seam. Bring the needle back through both layers of fabric just in front of the previous stitch. Push the needle back into the fabric between where the needle came in and out of the fabric to create the first stitch. These stitches can touch each other, as you see here, or you can space them a little farther apart. hand sewing tip firm pillowContinue this pattern until you are at the end of the seam. Push the needle to the back side and take your anchor stitch and knot in place.

hand sewing stitches - youmakeitsimple.com

I hope this makes sewing by hand a little less intimidating and helps you understand how to use these three basic stitches.

 

The running stitch could come in real handy to make the NO SEW FACE MASKS stay in place longer. Real simple to do!

Have fun sewing!

 

sewing by hand 3 important stitches - youmakeitsimple.com

 

 

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